Cederberg Wildlife

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One of our many resident agamas searching for his morning meal at Gecko Creek. Found the following descriptive from the website Scarce:

Biology The southern Rock Agama is probably the most well-known lizard in South Africa . This is because of its extensive range and the conspicuousness of the brightly coloured males perching on rocks and fence poles along roads. It is diurnal and mainly rock-dwelling. It may form dense colonies and both males and females maintain territories, but those of males are larger and may contain those of several females. It has a polygynous mating system and a dominant male will mate with several females within its territory. Females will mate with any male that gains access. A dominant male normally perches on the highest point in its territory and does a characteristic pushup display and head nodding when intruders come too close. When danger threatens it hugs the rock and its bright colours fade quickly so that it becomes camouflaged against the lichen-covered rocks. It can run at great speed over the rocks and also jump from rock to rock.Many people believe that it is highly poisonous. A farmer in the Kamiesberg once told us that the Rock Agama is responsible for many deaths among his cattle, particularly calves. According to him the lizard will jump on the back of the calve from a rock and then bite the calve in the neck region. The calf will die within minutes. There are of course no poisonous lizards in southern Africa, in fact there are only two poisonous species in the world, occurring in North and South America. It is, however, true that the rock agama can inflict a painful bite, drawing blood, because it has two fang-like teeth in the upper jaw.Its diet consists mainly of ants and termites, but it will also eat other invertebrates. It is oviparous and two clutches of 7-18 oval, soft-shelled eggs are laid in a shallow hole dug in damp soil, the first clutch during October-November and the second in January-February. Incubation takes 2-3 months.Agamas are closely related to chameleons, as is obvious from their ability to change their body colour and from the way they use the tongue in feeding. The tongue is, however, much shorter than that of chameleons.

 

Camping in the Cederberg at Gecko Creek

Gecko creek camping

This foursome from Cape Town stopped to pitch their tents underneath the shade of the gum trees at Gecko Creek Wilderness Lodge www.geckocreek.com while enroute to Namibia. We offer shaded campsites only steps away from 5 star ablutions. Guests can cool off in our swimming pool with stunning views of the Cederberg Mountains. Incuded in the R110 per person/per night camping fee, guests also enjoy access to our communal cooking facilities  (gas stoves, large fridges, pots and pans, cutlery and dishes), in our lapa and braii facilities in our boma.

Hoka

Yesterday was a huge day for Hoka. We rushed him to his vet in Cape Town for intensive tests, ultrasounds and x-rays. Suspicion was something was wrong with his kidneys. After two hours of anesthetic and examination, he was found to have spinal arthritis and some old scar tissue. Happily, we can say Hoka had a clean bill of health beyond that and he received his annual shots for rabies, etc. He returned to Gecko Creek a bit bruised and battered but should be fine by tomorrow morning.

Hoka returning to Gecko Creek from his visit to the vet.

Returning Guests

We enjoyed a cup of Nagle (traditional coffee brewed in Israel) with our friends Talya and Ranny this morning. They stayed at Gecko Creek in November for a few days while enroute to Namibia and now again 3 months later after travelling throughout southern Africa. Safe journey on your return home tomorrow to Isreal. We know you’ll be back!

Ranny and Talya

Social Networking Gecko Creek Style

Spent a wonderful evening around the fire sharing stories with guests from Denmark, Israel, United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, United States, Canada and South Africa!

Spent a wonderful evening around the fire sharing stories with guests from Denmark, Israel, United Kingdom, Germany, and Switzerland!

 

Guests to Gecko

Spent an enjoyable evening with our Jenman group of guests (from Germany and Canada) and had some delicious Bobotie (a traditional Cape Malay dish) expertly prepared by Todd the guide.

Spent an enjoyable evening with our Jenman group of guests (from Germany and Canada) and had some delicious Bobotie (a traditional Cape Malay dish) expertly prepared by Todd the guide.