Cederberg Camping and Bird-watching at Gecko Creek

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Gecko Creek Wilderness Lodge is a perfect destination to combine both camping in the Cederberg and bird-watching. Over 165 species of birds have been identified at Gecko Creek and guests camping enjoy waking to the sounds of hundreds of birds surrounding their tents.

 

Earlier this summer, we were fortunate to have two baby Cape Buntings hatch just outside the main house from their nest in a hanging plant. These two buntings now visit our guests who are self-catering in the lapa each meal. Here is a photo of Linton feeding one of the buntings some bread crumbs out of his hand. They are so tame they have become just like family!

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Some fast facts about the Cape Bunting from the Wikipedia website:

There are a dozen subspecies, differing in plumage, but all have the distinctive head pattern and rufous in the wings.

The Cape Bunting is 16 cm long. The adult has a black crown, white supercilium and black-bordered white ear coverts. The upperparts are grey brown with some dark streaks, and the wing coverts are chestnut. The tail is darker chestnut, and the underparts are grey with a pale throat. The sexes are very similar, but females may have a buff tone to the white head markings. Young birds have duller chestnut wings, a less distinct head pattern, and heavier streaking extending on to the breast and flanks. The call is an ascending zzoo-zeh-zee-zee. The song is a loud chirping chup chup chup chup chee chhep chu.

The Cape Bunting occurs in southern Africa from southwestern Angola, eastern Zambia, Zimbabwe and southern Tanzania to the Cape. Its habitat is rocky slopes and dry weedy scrub, mainly in mountains in the north of its range. It previously utilized stony arid areas with some short grass, but much of this has been lost to ploughing.

The Cape Bunting is not gregarious, and is normally seen alone, in pairs or family groups. It feeds on the ground on seeds, insects and spiders. Its lined cup nest is built low in a shrub or tussock. The 2-4 eggs are cream and marked with red-brown and lilac.

 

 

 

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